Crafting updates: knitting

Time for another crafting update: I’m slowly making progress on the 80’s style sweater, socks, and just finished my first shawl. The green blanket is finished as well, it’s not big but it’s very cozy πŸ™‚

Until next time, stay healthy and take care!

Knitting updates

This time there will be mostly pictures and little text πŸ™‚

So let’s begin! My blanket is almost ready, it fits on two circular needles, the lace section is almost over and there are two more skeins left. I don’t know yet how I will block it, because my yoga mat is too narrow, but I’ll find a way:

I started a smaller project with green cotton, a very pretty skein, but I’m not convinced by the progress, the needles could be a bit too large and the shawl-in-progress is somewhat missing structure. I’m tempted to frog it, but I’m almost finished, so mm, any thoughts?

My last and favorite project is a cotton sweater from a craft book printed in 1985, I chose to swap red for taupe and it’s coming out oh so nicely πŸ™‚

I really want to start another pair of socks (most of my stash consists of sock wool – maybe because it’s easy to grab a pretty skein than buy the amount for a pullover?) but I will finish one of those three projects first.

That’s all for now! Until next post, stay safe πŸ™‚

Knitting update: cotton shirt

I’m trying to complete a summerly project in time to wear it this year, but my chances are getting slim… nonetheless, it’s a very pleasant project to knit and to see developing πŸ™‚ The pattern is called Cloudesley and is available on Ravelry. I hope I will have enough yarn, I have used one skein already…

Speaking of autumn, I bought a small set of four seasonal plants that now adorn my windowsill. I hope they will get enough light and not too much cold. Next to them are some of the summer’s flowers, still green and cheerful!

Knitting updates

A few days ago I had the unrealistic plan to go buy one new magic loop cable and a second set of 2mm DPNs at my favourite wool shop, and of course I came back home with a few more things:

The shopping generated a peak of new-project-enthusiasm, and without hesitation I started a new pair of socks with the grey striped wool from a previous raid, and a cabled scarf with the purple-grey-green wool. The yellow linen sweater is almost finished, and I will make sure I will finish it before starting a new large project:

Here is some more progress on the cabled scarf. The wool is very soft!

And here are the finished socks from previous update. They are not as pink, the camera is doing its own color balance:

That’s all for now, stay tuned for more knitting pictures πŸ™‚

Panda Sky Cat Socks progress

As promised, here is a knitting update πŸ™‚ This time it is about socks, that I am knitting from pattern Panda Sky Cat Socks.

I am halfway of the second sock from this pair – luckily I have only two feet! I am impatient to be finished, because the first sock feels very comfy. The extra space on the instep allows a better fit and doesn’t stretch the heel area too much, if at all. You see the wider middle section quite well in the third picture.

My linen sweater goes forward too, I will post pictures another time. The sleeves are sort of uneventful, so I tend to knit them when I watch movies, and it is not happening very often lately (well, I watch movies but I don’t always knit along). It’s also quite a large project to carry around (it’s a seamless sweater, so I can’t just carry the active sleeve to the park or in the train, I have to bring the whole thing) so I work on it only at home. But it’s almost done and I hope to wear it before summer is over πŸ™‚

That’s it for today! I wish you a quiet Sunday and to stay safe and healthy.

Crafting updates #2

Hello all, here are some more pictures of my hobbies’ progress these last two weeks. I mostly knitted and drew:

I started this sock toe-up, so that I can stop anytime on the leg (actually I want to use the whole skein, so I will stop after I used 1/4 of it; for some reason most of the knitting instructions for socks estimate 100g per pair, but I will have pretty long socks using half of it). Toe-up sounded challenging at first, and the 2mm needles are both thinner than usual and a bit too long, but it’s progressing nicely and very regularly. As the weather is still cold I plan to use them before next cold season.

The yellow sweater is made of linen and it follows the Audierne pattern by Regina Moessmer. I am fascinated by how it drapes and am very curious to see how it will look after the first wash. The picture shows the back of the sweater, with the cables-and-ladder pattern. One cable runs below each arm as well.

Regarding drawing, I finally took the courage to start using the waterbrush I bought almost a year ago (the water-filled pen on top of the picture), and followed the waterbrush introduction by John Muir Laws. This is my first experiment with it:

I was very surprised by how easy it was to paint uniform shades of colour. There is very definitely space for improvement but I had way worse results with a simple brush. The palette is an ordinary kindergarten set so the colours have no special merit in the result, nor the water πŸ™‚ I will definitely keep using this tool, and keep you posted with useful tips and links I happen to find.

I wish you all to stay healthy and safe, and maybe even sane, until the lockdown measures will be progressively lifted. I wish you find great ways to stay in contact with your loved ones and to not have to worry for work or housing. Hugs to everyone!

Life update

I have been quiet recently and I am now staying home, as many of the people I know, and I must say I am lucky and privileged to be able to stay safe and have all I need.

Apart from home office, I am knitting quite a lot, and making good progress on the Bairn blanket and the Audierne linen pullover:

I even started drawing again… not much, but I feel that I need to keep in touch with the combination of nature, observation and scribbling. John Muir Law‘s videos are for me a source of inspiration, insight and cheerfulness. Even when I don’t draw along, I feel revived in my interest for nature.

And last but not least, a pair of wood pigeons chose my windowsill as the place to make their nest. I had a heather plant that didn’t manage to thrive, and they apparently found it a great start for a nest, to the point that they first laid an egg and then brought twigs. Then yesterday I was nearby when they switched nesting duty, and I saw a second egg! I am very curious on what will happen next, and will keep you updated too πŸ™‚

That’s all for now, I wish you all to stay safe and healthy, and to be able to deal with these challenging times as best as you can.

Knitting progress

I’d like to share a few pictures of my knitting projects. Lately I got up to speed to a point that I have three or four open projects, and I can resume each of them without having forgotten too much, or the stitches got the mark from staying on the needles:

Rye socks – my second pair, got a bit faster, and more regular in the double-pointed needles knitting
My second Flax pullover made with sock wool, it’s really comfy and easy to wash
My first cable project: a baby blanket, the pattern is Bairn from Julie Hoover

I like the combination of repetition and change that is in varying proportion in each knitting project. The Flax pullover had large parts of uniform stitches, while the Bairn blanket requires a lot of attention the whole time. I am not yet that good in picturing the result of a written set of instructions, so I am more or less surprised by what takes shape while knitting, and I hope that this sensation will stay. The silence and concentration are comfortable to me, and the presence of other knitters when we gather at our meetup is a mix of talking/sharing and of staying in our own bubble, busy with our current work. I find this less stressful than a social meeting based on chatting, because I like to listen and to observe, which is very interesting when each participant of the meetup brings a new technique, a gadget, or a story.

Today I bought some more kilometers of yarn at the yearly sock wool sale of my favourite shop… stay tuned for more colourful pictures! Too bad that the Internet doesn’t allow to share the texture of the wool, but maybe that will be implemented soon? πŸ™‚

The way and the shortcuts

I was thinking about how setting a goal shapes the way one takes to reach it.

Where am I going?

Let me pick an example with music, my most familiar environment. Let’s say my orchestra plans to play a given difficult piece for next concert. That goal will influence all rehearsals, filling them with a detailed plan, that includes the progressive steps to the full execution of that piece: separate rehearsals per section, focus on getting to play to the required speed, focus on expression, and finally playing the piece properly from start to finish.

When difficulties arise during rehearsals and it starts to look like we are not progressing as fast as we thought, it’s time to find shortcuts. We simplify our parts, play a little slower than required, remove details. This is where I start to diverge from how one is expected to work. I rarely think about the goal directly, it is for me more of a part of the landscape that I sometimes remember to look at, but my interest is on my immediate surroundings, on the atmosphere at the current rehearsal, on what I can do right now. I’m relieved that someone else is responsible for keeping the boat sailing straight towards the goal, because I just couldn’t! My work is more of a fractal exploration, without direction, with the focus on how I walk, and no eye on the time – in this mindset, shortcuts simply make no sense. I observe and I accidentally also take part to the rehearsal. This is where I’m not offering any grip to the usual motivation talks which sound likeΒ  “Don’t you feel the pressure, the urge to reach the goal?”. No, I don’t. It doesn’t mean I explicitely avoid it, but simply that it will be the side effect of me having the space to wander at will. I first had to prove that my random exploration takes me to the goal anyway, before I was given the trust to be left free alongside the bridled horses, apparently aimless, for the surprise of some.

I felt that this can be a good parallel with how one works with animals, for example during horse riding. I sometimes get the feeling that the rider has a goal in mind and gets to the point where the test approaches and they start looking for shortcuts, but that is where+why the horse loses connection – because the horse doesn’t seem to think in terms of goals, and the proposed shortcuts look like forced steps that take attention further away from the flow of observation, of being in the present. This gearing up tends to make things work both worse and slower, it requires even more shortcuts, and that brings the opposite of the desired effect!Β  It takes a lot of trust to stop this vicious cycle when the deadline is approaching, but re-focusing on the present seems to me one of the few respectful and efficient ways out.

I hope that makes sense! Let me know if that resonates with you, I’m curious to read about your experiences with deadlines, goals and shortcuts.

Yoga update: the practice of perception and the avoidance of strain

The yoga class I have been attending since January is becoming really interesting for me. I have been a very sport-averse person until recently, and I have been using my body with the bare minimum of awareness possible. Through this yoga lessons I have finally started to notice that: 1- my body is actually able to do more than sit and walk; 2- practicing a physical activity like yoga requires more than simple strength, flexibility and endurance, and this means: concentration, balance, awareness of posture and alignment, memory (for longer sequences, and the details of each posture), coordination, perception of effort so that it doesn’t harm any part of the body.

BKS Iyengar Sirsasana – from Svenja Karsten’s artwork on svejar.com

At first it was a new activity for me and I was trying to follow the teacher’s instructions, but was often distracted by tension in some part of the body, or had to focus on keeping balance and could not think of anything else. Now I start to notice how I can guide my attention to each part of the body and check if it’s in the right position, if there is the right amount of tension in the muscles and ligaments of that part, then go on to the next one. Sometimes it happens that I feel the overall tension of the body as a whole, that there is a good amount of strength in every part of it, nowhere too much, and I take it as the sign that I’m doing the posture correctly. And it’s so rewarding!

This kind of experience is quite far from my initial learning process with music (and a bunch of other things in life), where usually the opposite worked fine: especially with the drums, I have previously been able to make (temporary) progress by producing a lot of tension on the arm(s) or wrist(s) or finger(s) and therefore produce the sounds at the desired speed and intensity. However, it’s a dead end, because tension is both damaging to the body on the long term, and it is a sign that some technical challenge is being forced through instead of properly processed – and that means that progress actually stops there. Jared Falk mentioned something along these lines in the beginning of a longer video on Drumeo, and I’m glad that there is a convergence among the various disciplines I am practising, so I can reuse the mindset everywhere πŸ™‚