Drawing updates: coloring book and animal sketching

Today I dedicated some time to drawing. First, as a relaxing activity, I picked a set of brightly-coloured pencils and started filling this drawing of a dragon:

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The book is called Mein zauberhaftes Muster-Malbuch (my magic colouring book of patterns), but I am equally inclined to recommend any book with subjects of your liking!

Then I wanted to do some animal drawings, after having seen this video of one of John Muir Law’s lessons (it’s 1h30 long but totally worth seeing until the end!):

I was chatting with friends about alpine ibex and Wikimedia offered me a very cute picture of a Spanish ibex kid:

Capra pyrenaica victoriae, juvenile -- 2013 -- Laguna Grande, Sierra de Gredos, España.jpg
By J.Ligero & I.BarriosOwn work, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link

… that I sketched, trying to understand a bit of his inner structure (of the legs, essentially):

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I plan to make further drawings of this little one, the fur texture is very interesting. I’ll keep you posted 🙂

Picnic at the park

I recently have been so inspired by this list of 50 activities to do on your own, published by Jo Chunyan, that I printed the picture version of the list and hung it in my living room.

I loved the idea of giving value to time and activities done alone: in fact, there are many things on that list that are done outdoors, and/or involve physical activity, or let you improve the state of your home, and so on. For the shy personality of mine, it is a gentler invitation to get out and move my body, without the implication that I must interact with people or exhaust myself – and most importantly, that time alone can be spent in many ways (more than those 50, for sure!), which include my current indoor favourites: decluttering my room and reading.

Long story short, today the sun was shining, so I picked up two items from that list:

  • 42: Go to the park with some sandwiches, a picnic blanket and a good book
  • 49: Take a photo to depict each hour of your day (I actually read it as: take a picture of the same place at one-hour intervals)

Out I went to the park nearby with my packed lunch (I had leftovers from yesterday’s pasta, and fresh fruits and vegs, so it was really quick to put together) and a book that I have to read for my Montessori diploma.

I ate, read, dozed, smiled to passers-by, and took three picture at one hour interval:

Then I left because it had become too warm and sunny, but it was a great time outside, relaxing and interesting 🙂

 

Drawing update

Last weekend I visited my family and took some time to doodle.

I made a landscapeito of the lake we went to for the afternoon: I decided to limit the time to 5 minutes, so that I focused on getting the framing, shading and details right. In this drawing, I tried to make the background lighter than the foreground, a way of suggesting distance. I am not super happy with the water, but I think that I captured the essence of the scene.

Source: Flickr

My mum is currently practising guitar together with her colleague Biagio, so they invited me to their rehearsal. It was a perfect occasion to draw! I took around half an hour to make the drawing below. It was easier to draw the parts of the body that didn’t move much (right arm, shoulders), but hard to draw the head and the left hand, that moved a lot. For these parts I chose a particular position and waited for them to show it, drew a couple lines or hatching, and wait for next occasion. I learned about this technique from a workshop about wildlife sketches, where you choose several postures of an animal and work in parallel, adding details to each doodle every time the animal falls into that position. It is indeed a valid technique for any moving subject.

Source: Flickr

“Nature connection through deliberate attention and curiosity” – John Muir Law’s TEDx talk

I was introduced to John Muir Law‘s learning materials for natural illustrators by fellow participants of NHI101x, bought his book “Nature Drawing and Journaling”, enjoyed the bubbling stream of ideas and excellent illustrations (I’ll write a review as soon as I finish it, stay tuned!) and now I follow his blog, where he regularly posts drawing tutorials and other useful tips. Today I watched his TEDx talk about enhancing the quality of our observation of nature, by the means of simple and effective methods that unleash our curiosity on natural subjects. I find it a brilliant summary on the art of observation – a compact starter kit like very few others. Enjoy!