Bread update: breads from #51 to #60

Yesterday I baked bread #60 in my list, and here are pictures of the last ten breads I baked:

Actually, I have no picture of bread #52, and as you see I have grown a preference for whole grain loaves. I try to keep them interesting by varying the recipes a bit, but I rarely change the shape 🙂 Making buns require more space to leaven and bake, so it has to be a special occasion!

Happy baking and cooking everyone 🙂

 

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Rhubarb-ginger-lemon jam

From a visit to the local library I brought back this intruguing little book about ginger:

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Publisher’s page

The title translates roughtly to “Ginger – health and taste” and is a collection of interesting recipes with ginger, with an informative introduction about the plant, its history, and its many culinary and medical applications. From the many recipes I picked the one for rhubarb jam, that included gelling sugar (that I bought last year but didn’t manage to use), lemon and of course ginger juice. I went grocery shopping and I came back with a kilo of rhubarb, in the form of three huge stalks (really huge! I had never seen such large stalks in Italy!). At home I washed and cut the stalks in small pieces, and removed only the largest fibres. I put the rhubarb pieces in a plastic container, poured the sugar, put a lid on and put everything in the fridge overnight. The day after, the rhubarb had let out a lot of juice. I asked my friend to taste a piece of rhubarb, to know whether to filter the fibrous parts away, but he said they were quite soft, so I blended everything in a purée and transferred it into a pot. I cooked the jam until it started gelling, and then added the juice of a lemon and a lot of ginger juice (it’s sold in small bottles here, and it’s so practical). I stirred the jam and poured it into little jars.

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I’m not that fond of ginger flavour, but my friend is, and this jam has become a fixed part of our breakfast 🙂 It goes especially well on the dark bread that I just baked, and is #59 in my bread count:

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Baking progress: breads #41 to #49

With a short break during the Christmas holidays, my baking streak continues, with mostly positive results 🙂

I’m learning a lot by baking regularly, and more importantly, by taking notes about how the different steps went (how long the dough was left leavening, how hot was the water, if I used a different flour, how was the texture of the dough after mixing, how did the baking phase go…). It helps me noticing what went well and bring it to attention for the next bread. I have my favourite recipe, the one I’m now sure of the result, but I like to pick up recipes with different flours, that require specific preparation steps (cooking part of the dough in a pot, make two or three pre-leavened doughs, adding lemon to enable the binding of gluten…) just to add interest to the process. One thing I have learned, thanks to a few burnt crusts, is that I can’t leave the loaf in the oven completely alone and keep track of the smell, because it will come too late for me to fix anything. So it’s better for me to stay near the oven for the first 10-15 minutes, when the crust becomes golden-brown, then lower the oven temperature and leave the bread complete the following 20-30 minutes baking phase on its own.

I’m considering to make it a small side job, but I’m unsure if making bread on a larger scale could be too time-consuming, or also difficult. Any ideas or tips about that? Thanks in advance!

Various updates

Last week has been quite busy, and I didn’t post as often as usual. To summarise a bit, I knitted a colourful hat (Twisp)…

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…then planned the colors and patterns for my next project, a Strange Brew sweater from Tin Can Knits:

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I kept taking pictures of the tree near my bus stop:

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I took the ferry in Köpenick for maybe the last time of the year (well, it depends when the river will freeze):

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I baked bread #44, that looked and tasted great:

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and right now, a batch of apple mini-muffins:

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That’s all for today! I wish you a good start of the week 🙂

November sun

Yesterday was the sunniest day of the last three weeks. The yellow of the few leaves still left on the trees made a nice contrast with the blue sky.

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I gladly basked in the sun while waiting for my train… and I wasn’t the only one:

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I came home and baked my best bread ever, #42. I made a single cut, deeper than usual, and the crust opened nicely around it. I let the upper heat on for ten minutes more, and the crust came out deliciously crispy. It’s the fourth time I follow this recipe, I think I won’t get it wrong anymore!

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Happy November everyone 🙂

 

From the kitchen: bread #39

Baking updates! Bread #39 followed the same recipe as #38, but I had to be creative with flours, as I discovered after making the Vorteig (pre-dough, with flour, water and yeast, left to rise for a few hours before adding all ingredients) that I had too little wheat flour left. I added Roggen and Dinkel flours, as well as a good amount of durum wheat semolina, and the resulting bread was brown and fluffy, with one of the best crusts ever!

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I had made a few changements in the cooking part, namely baking directly in the casserole dish. The downside is that the upper crust gets crisp and brown, while the lower crust and the sides remain soft – a bit too much. This is because I let the bread rise in the casserole dish, heated the oven, and put the casserole dish in the oven together with the bread, without pre-heating it. It took a while to get to temperature, therefore did not cook the lower part of the bread that much.

I hope you are inspired by my experiments and that you soon will try (or resume) baking too! I’ll be glad to hear back from you, and maybe I can start answering your questions about baking? Let’s try 🙂

From the kitchen: bread #38

Yesterday I ran out of bread and decided to bake it myself, summoning my courage to overcome the bad experience of bread #37, which I had to throw away (it was underleavened and partially raw after one hour in the oven, and no further toasting could save it).

I followed precisely the steps of Weizenmischbrötchen recipe in the Brotbackbuch, took half a day from start to finish, and I obtained two light, fluffy loaves:

I am a bit sad that I used only dry yeast, but I’m so happy for such a nice result 🙂